Author Topic: Bison Roulades with Wojapi and Indian Fry Bread  (Read 104 times)

Olga Drozd

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Bison Roulades with Wojapi and Indian Fry Bread
« on: September 05, 2018, 08:42:58 PM »
Bison Roulades with Wojapi

Wojapi is a traditional Sioux fruit made with chokecherry juice but you can use cranberry juice.

3 pounds boneless buffalo sirloin, sliced very thin in pieces about 4 to 6 inches long and 4 inches wide
1/3 cup Dijon mustard
1/3 cup minced yellow onion
6 dill pickle quarter spears
2 Tablespoons corn oil or canola oil
1 cup chicken stock
3 strips bacon, cut crosswise in half
1 1/2 cups wojapi (recipe follows)

WOJAPI:

1 1/2 cups fresh or frozen chokecherry juice or cranberry juice
2 Tablespoons honey, or more to taste
1 teaspoon cornstarch, or more if necessary mixed with 1/4 cup water until smooth

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F
.  Stack the sliced buffalo in 6 neat piles.  Brush the top and sides of each pile with mustard and sprinkle with onion.  Place a pickle quarter in the middle of each pile.  Roll the meat tightly around the pickles and tie each roulade with kitchen string.

Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat.  Add the roulades, and brown them on all sides, about 10 minutes total. Transfer the roulades to a casserole dish and pour the stock around them.  Place a bacon piece on top of each roulade; the bacon will help keep the buffalo moist.  Cover, and bake for 3 hours, or until the buffalo is tender.

Serve the roulades on top of or alongside bread, fry bread, mashed potatoes, or noodles, with wojapi drizzled over all.

For the Wojapi:  Bring the fruit juice to a boil in a small saucepan.  Stir in the 2 Tablespoons honey.  Spoon out a teaspoon or so of the syrup, let it cool, taste it, and add more honey if you like.  Stir together the 1 teaspoon cornstarch and 1/4 cup of water until you have a smooth paste.  Whisk the cornstarch mixture into the juice to thicken it.  The wojapi should be a thick syrup; add more cornstarch mixture, if necessary, to thicken it.  Serve immediately.  Serves 6.

INDIAN FRY BREAD:

4 cups all purpose flour
1 Tablespoon baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1 1/2 teaspoons canola oil or corn oil
Lukewarm water to make a soft dough
Vegetable oil, for frying

Sift the flour, baking powder, and salt together into a bowl.  Using a wooden spoon, stir in the 1 1/2 teaspoons of oil and enough lukewarm water to make a soft dough.  Turn out the dough onto a floured board and dust your hands with flour.  Knead the dough until it has some spring, about 5 minutes.

Pinch the dough into 8 small balls and pat and stretch each ball into a round about 1/4 inch thick.

Add the oil for frying to a depth of 2 inches in a heavy skillet.  Heat the oil to a temperature of about 350 degrees F.  Fry the rounds, 1 or 2 at a time, turning each one once, until they are puffy and golden, about 4 minutes total.  Transfer with a slotted spoon to absorbent paper to drain and cool.  Repeat with the remaining rounds.  Serve warm or at room temperature.  Makes 8 pieces fry bread.